Burrows, Tracy L, et al. “Associations between Dietary Intake and Academic Achievement in College Students: A Systematic Review.” MDPI, Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, 25 Sept. 2017, www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/5/4/60.

  • In the article, Associations Between Dietary Intake and Academic Achievement in College Students: A Systematic Review, Tracy L. Burrows, Megan C. Whatnall, Amanda J. Patterson and Melinda J. Hutchesson suggest that eating a well-balanced diet does have a positive effect on academic achievement in college students, but future studies should consider the use of validated dietary assessment methods, comprehensive measures of overall diet, and use standardized assessment and reporting of academic outcomes.  They justify their claim by including results from multiple different research experiments that measure diet quality and academic performance.  Researchers wrote this review to evaluate the current evidence examining dietary intake and academic achievement.  The authors’ intended audience is other researchers, because they offer advice and recommendations for conducting a related experiment.

Elzein, Aseel, et al. “Prevalence of Food Insecurity and Its Association with Health and Academic Outcomes among College Freshmen.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 11 Jan. 2017, academic.oup.com/advances/article/8/1/4/4568361.

  • In The Prevalence of Food Insecurity and Its Association with Health and Academic Outcomes among College Freshman, Aseel Elzein, Karla Shelnutt, Sarah Colby and other researchers claim that food insecurity among college students plays a role in negative health and academic outcomes.  Authors support this claim by analyzing the food security status, sociodemographic characteristic and grade point average of college freshman.  Researchers conduct this study in order to assess the prevalence of food insecurity among college freshman and its association with health and academic outcomes.  The authors’ intended audience is society as a whole, as researchers discuss food insecurity for college students across the United States.

Ghosh, Santanu, et al. “Academic Performance and Nutritional Status – A Case Study on College Students in North Tripura.” IOSR Journal of Research & Method in Education, 2013, pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5084/d56d5740989659af0b1d660873afd9b89834.pdf.

  • In Academic Performance and Nutritional Status – A Case Study on College Students in North Tripura (2013), Dr. Santanu Ghosh, Dr. Sambhunath Rakshit, and Dr. Manik Bhattacharya suggest that proper nutrition benefits academic performance among college students.  Dr. Ghosh, Dr. Rakshit, and Dr. Bhattacharya support their claims by studying and comparing the nutrient intake and academic scores of college students in North Tripura.  Researchers conducted this study in order to discover what nutrients are beneficial for academic performance.  The authors’ audience seems to be educators and college students, as the tone is very serious and informational.

Hagedorn, Rebecca L, et al. “Expenditure, Coping, and Academic Behaviors among Food-Insecure College Students at 10 Higher Education Institutes in the Appalachian and Southeastern Regions.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 24 Apr. 2019, academic.oup.com/cdn/article/3/6/nzz058/5479243.

  • In the article, Expenditure, Coping and Academic Behaviors among Food-Insecure College Students at 10 Higher Education Institutes in the Appalachian and Southeastern Regions, Rebecca L Hagedorn, Laura H McArthur, Lanae B Hood, and other researchers asserts that food insecurity among college students causes poor academic performance.  Authors support this claim by measuring food-insecurity status for students through the USDA Adult Food Security Survey and studying the association with students’ academic progress scale.  The researchers’ purpose for this study was to determine the prevalence of food insecurity among college students in the Appalachian and Southeastern regions of the United States, and to determine the association between food-insecurity status and money expenditures, coping strategies, and academic performance among a regional sample of college students.  The authors’ intended audience is society as a whole, as researchers discuss food insecurity for college students across the United States.

Kanarek, Robin B., and David Swinney. “Effects of Food Snacks on Cognitive Performance in Male College Students.” Appetite, Academic Press, 27 Jan. 2005, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0195666390900519.

  • In the article, Effects on Food Snacks on Cognitive Performance in Male Students, Robin B. Kanarek and David Swinney suggest that eating an energy-rich snack has a positive effect on cognitive performance in male college students.  The authors support this claim by conducting two experiments where they compare the digit span recall, arithmetic reasoning, reading, and attention levels of college males who eat a protein-rich snack versus those who consumed a diet soda.  The purpose of this experiment is to determine if eating an energy-containing snack has a positive impact on cognitive performance on tasks that require sustained attention for male college students.  The authors’ audience is college students because this experiment can be very beneficial for them.

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